7 POD (7 POT)

Species: Chinense Origin: Trinidad Heat: Nuclear

This variety is from the Chaguanas area of Trinidad. It has built up an almost myth like quality. In Caribbean regions it is also known as 7 pot as one pod is said to provide enough heat to spice up 7 pots of stew. Pods are habenaro like in there shape but have the characteristic 'pimpling' as found on another fearsome variety - the Naga Morich. Unusually the proportion of Placental tissue is very high - a allusion to why this pepper is so outrageously hot. We now see this pepper in various colours - red, yellow, brown, white and burgundy. No doubt purple will be along soon, followed by Cappuchino, Dusty Pink...


© theChileman

© theChileman
 

AJI BRAZILIAN STARFISH (PI 439368)

Species: Baccatum Origin: Brazil Heat: Hot

A much sort after and very unusual variety due to its uniquely shaped peppers. This tall plant has a vine like habit and produces good yields of ¾" long by 1 ¾" wide starfish shaped peppers that are very pungent. The peppers mature from green to red approximately 90 days after transplanting. The white flowers of this plant are also very attractive with the distinctive Baccatum greenish-yellow markings. ## HIGHLY RECOMMENDED ##



© Mark McMullan
 

AJI LEMON DROP (PI 315024)

Species: Baccatum Origin: Peru Heat: Hot

This terrifically hot, citrus-flavored pepper is a popular seasoning pepper in Peru where it is known as 'Kellu Uchu'. It is also known in the western world as 'Hot lemon' or 'Lemon Drop'. The bright yellow, crinkled, cone-shaped fruits are about 2-1/2" long and 1/2" wide and mature from green to yellow approximately 100 days after transplanting (Long season) have less seeds than the average pepper, containing than 15 seeds on average. They plant is vine like typically reaching a height of about 3 ft. Like other baccatum species this pepper was practically unknown in the West until the early 1990s, but are now gaining wide scale popularity.


© Mark McMullan

© theChileman
 

DEDO DE MOCA (PI 497972)

Species: Baccatum Origin: Brazil Heat: Medium

Fruits 3 to 4in long, very narrow with a strong flavour. Also listed as BGH 72. Note: The BGH classification system for chile varieties indicates an accession from the genebank at Banco de Germoplasma de Hortaliças, Brazil


© Jakob Axelsson

© Mats & Patricia Pettersson
 

GOLDEN NUGGET

Species: Annuum Origin: USA Heat: Medium

1½' tall plant with purple stems, purple and white varigated leaves, and white and purple flowers with upright, 1" tall, conical fruits turning dark golden yellow; very attractive.


© Allen M Boatman

© Mickey Baker
 

HABANERO ORANGE

Species: Chinense Origin: Unknown Heat: Very Hot

Habanero Orange chiles are a little slower to germinate than many others, but this chile variety is worth the wait as it is 40 times hotter than a standard Jalapeno Pepper! A producer of light green, thin, crinkled peppers which ripen to a brilliant orange-red coloration (85-95 days), each chile pepper is around 1½ inches long by about 1 inch across. This variety is dangerously hot and not for the faint hearted, tipping in at an eye watering 200,000 - 300,000 scoville heat units.


© South Devon Chilli Farm
 

HABANERO WHITE

Species: Chinense Origin: Peru Heat: Very Hot

The White Habanero also know as 'Peruvian white Habanero' is a lovely & rare variety that is hard to come by and said to originate from Peru. These firey hot lantern shaped peppers grow on small, but very high yielding bushy pepper plants with the creamy-white colored pods measuring approximately 2 inches long by 3/4 of an inch in diamater. If you like seraing hot chiles, this could be the one for you as they have been rated at over 300,000 scoville heat units.


© John Leone

© Harry Nyström
 

INCA RED DROP

Species: Baccatum Origin: Peru Heat: Medium

Description currently unavailable.


© Bayou Traders

© Mickey Baker
 

MALAWI BIRDSEYE

Species: Annuum Origin: Malawi Heat: Unknown

Description currently unavailable.


© Jukka Kilpinen
 

NAGA MORICH (DORSET NAGA)

Species: Chinense Origin: Bangladesh Heat: Nuclear

Naga Morich meaning 'snake or serpent Chile’ is an apt name for this ferociously hot variety as eating even the smallest slither of one of these pods is described by some as like drinking cobra venom!!. It is believed to be very closely related to its Indian cousin, the Bhut jolokia (Bih jolokia) and extreme care should be taken when handling these firebombs. In recent tests, one Naga Morich pod registered 1,598,227 SHU. The thin walled wrinkled pods have a high degree of variability in shape although they are generally wedge shaped with three locules and average about 2 inches long by 1 inch wide. They ripen from a rich green through to yellow/orange and finally to a rich red approximately 120 days after transplanting. The extremely long, curved and annular constriction of the Calyx at junction with the peduncle is also a notable feature of this variety. Plants are large and bushy, with ours growing almost 3ft tall. Leaves are ovate in shape and pale green in colour. Plants also display multiple pods and flowers per node (often 5-6 pods per node) and corollas possess the characteristic greenish tinge of other varieties in the chinense species. It is used sparingly (and with great care!) in Bengali cookery and is thought to originate from Northern Bangladesh.


© Mark McMullan

© Mark McMullan
 

 

 

AJI LEMON DROP (PI 315024)
AJI BRAZILIAN STARFISH (PI 439368)
DEDO DE MOCA (PI 497972)
GOLDEN NUGGET
HABANERO ORANGE
HABANERO WHITE
INCA RED DROP
MALAWI BIRDSEYE
TURBO PUBE (PI 585267)
7 POD (7 POT)
NAGA MORICH (DORSET NAGA)